How to Choose the Right Medicine Ball

Medicine balls are commonly used for plyometric and power development drills.

The two most common types of medicine balls can be categorized by how well they bounce, high bounce or low bounce.

There’s a time and need for both, but choosing the right medicine ball can easily make or break the effectiveness of the exercise.

A medicine ball that bounces can effectively trigger the stretch-shortening cycle of a plyometric exercise, while a medicine ball with low bounce will place the emphasis on the concentric power output.

How to Choose the Right Medicine Ball

In this video, I discuss this more and show the different emphasis that different medicine balls will produce:

Get More Performance Therapy Tips

I’ve really been publishing a ton of great videos on social media lately, including this series of “Performance Therapy Tips.”  Be sure to follow me on Instagram and Facebook to get them all!

 

The Science of Plyometrics

If you want to learn more, check out my Inner Circle presentation that overviews the neurological basis, phases, and science of plyometrics:

To access this webinar:

 

The Right Way, and Wrong Way, to Do Plyometrics

Plyometric exercises have been used for decades in both the rehabilitation and sports performance settings.

I love how plyometrics can effectively be used for power development, but are also valuable in the rehabilitation setting to gradually apply load to healing tissue while working on both force production and dissipation.

To truly perform plyometric exercises and get the most out of them, you must understand the science behind the stretch-shortening cycle.  I talk about this in detail in an Inner Circle presentation on the Science of Plyometric Exercises.

To fully maximize the benefit of the stretch-shortening cycle, you have to quickly transition from the eccentric loading phase to the concentric explosion phase of the drill.

If you perform the drills to slow, you’ll reduce the effect of the stretch-shortening cycle and decrease the efficacy of the plyometric exercise.

 

The Right Way, and Wrong Way, to Do Plyometrics

Watch the quick video below to see what I mean:

The Science of Plyometrics

If you want to learn more, check out my Inner Circle presentation that overviews the neurological basis, phases, and science of plyometrics:

To access this webinar:

The Science of Plyometrics

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on The Science of Plyometrics is now available.

 

The Science Behind Plyometrics

The Science of Plyometrics

This month’s Inner Circle webinar is on The Science of Plyometrics.  In this presentation, I overview the foundation behind plyometric training so that you can perform them effectively,

This webinar will cover:

  • The goals of plyometric training
  • How the muscles spindles and golgi tendon organs interact
  • The 3 phases of plyometric exercises
  • The right way, and wrong way, to perform plyometric exercises

To access this webinar:

 

6 Hip Mobility Drills Everyone Should Perform

Recently, I have seen dozens of social media posts with “advanced” hip mobility drills that made me stop and think…

Should we actually be seeking to perform these advanced variations?

I would argue most people still need the basics, and should incorporate just a handful of more simple drills as the foundation of their mobility drills.

The internet is famous for sensationalizing the drills that look “fancy” rather than the ones that are likely the most effective.  It’s probably another case of the Pareto Principle, where 80% of the drills seen online should only be performed 20% of the time, and conversely, 20% of the drills seen online should be performed 80% of the time!  Heck it may be even less than that when it comes to hip mobility.

To make matters worse, the more advanced hip mobility drills are probably inappropriate for most people.  In my experience, limitations in hip mobility seem to be more related to the individuals unique anatomy, boney adaptations, and alignment rather than simple soft tissue limitations.  So, forcing hip mobility drills through anatomical limitations is just going to cause more impingement and issues with the hips, rather than helping.

Sometimes less is more.

 

My Favorite Hip Mobility Drills

I wanted to share my favorite hip mobility that I use with most of my clients.  I think you should really focus on these hip mobility drills before proceeding to more advanced variations.  If these don’t do the trick, it’s probably best that you seek out a qualified movement specialist to assess the reason behind you hip mobility limitations, rather than forcing more drills.

 

Quadruped Rockbacks

The first drill is a quadruped rockback.  This is one of my favorite drills for the hips, and feels great to loosen up the adductors and hip joint into flexion.  Plus, I do these barefoot to get more dorsiflexion and great toe extension.

 

Adductor Quadruped Rockbacks

The adductor quadruped rockback is a variation of the rockback that involves straightening out one hip.  This takes away a little bit of the hip flexion benefit, but enhances the effect on the adductors.  Performing this on both sides is the best of both worlds.

 

True Hip Flexor Stretch

The true hip flexor stretch is probably the most fundamental hip mobility drill we should all be performing.  I started calling it the “true” hip flexor stretch because the more common versions of this do not lock in the posterior pelvic tilt and just end up torquing the anterior capsule.

 

Posterior Hip Stretch

The posterior hip stretch feels great on the glutes and hits the posterior hip area, which is often tight.  Many people feel like the can get into a hip hinge much better after this drill.

 

Figure 4 Stretch

The posterior hip is a complicated area of muscles, I often pair the figure 4 stretch with the posterior hip stretch above to get different areas.  For me, I simple go by the feedback from my client on what feels more effective for them.

 

Spiderman

The Spiderman hip mobility drill is likely the most advanced of this list, which is why I have it last.  This is something I don’t always perform right away, but is a goal of mine to integrate with everyone eventually.  This requires more hip mobility that the others, so acts as a nice progression to put these all together.

 

How to Get Started with Hip Mobility Drills?

So wondering how to get started?  Start with the quadruped rockbacks and hip flexor stretch.  Those two are very foundational and will be the most impactful for most people.  Once you get those down, progress to the posterior hip stretch and figure 4 to hit more of the posterior aspect of the hip.  Lastly, progress to the Spiderman drill.

I honestly don’t think you need much more than that, and if you seek to get too aggressive with hip mobility drills, you often make things worse.

 

 

4 Ways to Modify the Squat So Everyone Can Perform

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on 4 Ways to Modify the Squat So Everyone Can Perform is now available.

4 Ways to Modify the Squat So Everyone Can Perform

This month’s Inner Circle webinar is on 4 Ways to Modify the Squat So Everyone Can Perform.  In this presentation, I discuss why the squat is something we shouldn’t just blindly avoid out of fear in our rehab patients or fitness clients.  We some simple modifications, you should be able to incorporate the squat in almost anyone’s program.

This webinar will cover:

  • How different bar positions impact the body
  • Why most people shouldn’t squat with “textbook” technique
  • How to quickly screen a person and tweak their form to individualize their squat pattern

 

To access this webinar:

2 New Self Myofascial Release Tools to Try

In my recent article on the best self myofascial release tools, I overviewed a variety of tools that people can use based on their goals and needs.

I mentioned a couple of newer self myofascial release tools that I have started using instead of a simple foam roller.  I still like foam rollers, but think that many people could benefit even more by upgrading to these newer tools.

A lot of people have been asking me about these newer tools, so I wanted to film a couple of videos showing you more.

 


Acumobility Eclipse Foam Roller and Mobility Ball

 


Mobilitas Mobility Sphere

 


Try these two new products and I think you’ll be impressed.  And be sure to check out my other recommendations of foam rollers, massage sticks, and other mobility tools.

 

 

 

What Exactly Is a SLAP Tear? Top 5 Things You Need to Know About a Superior Labral Lesion

Superior Labral SLAP Tear**Updated in 2017**

A very common diagnosis for shoulder injuries is a superior labral tear, or SLAP tear.  SLAP stands for Superior Labral tear Anterior to Posterior.  There many different variations of SLAP tears, which have different levels of severity and treatment strategies.  Back in the day, surgeons would want to operate on all SLAP tears but we learned that some do well without surgery.  In fact, some SLAP tears aren’t even worrisome .

Understanding how a SLAP lesion occurs and what exactly is happening pathologically is extremely important to diagnose and treat these shoulder injuries appropriately.

This article is part of a 4-part series on SLAP Lesions

 

Classification of SLAP Lesions

As you can see in the figure, the long head of the biceps tendon inserts directly into the superior labrum.  There are several variations of injuries that can occur to the superior labrum where the biceps anchor attaches.

Following a retrospective review of 700 shoulder arthroscopies, Snyder et al: Arthroscopy 1990, identified 4 types of superior labrum lesions involving the biceps anchor. Collectively they termed these SLAP lesions, in reference to their anatomic location: Superior Labrum extending from Anterior to Posterior. This was the original definition but as we continue to learn more about SLAP tears, they certainly do not always extend from anterior to posterior. But, the most important concept to know is that a SLAP lesion is an injury to the superior labrum near the attachment of the biceps anchor.

SLAP Tear Classification

Type I SLAP Lesions

Type I SLAP lesions were described as being indicative of isolated fraying of the superior labrum with a firm attachment of the labrum to the glenoid. These lesions are typically degenerative in nature. At this time, it is currently believed that the majority of the active population may have a Type I SLAP lesion and this is often not even considered pathological by many surgeons.

 

Type II SLAP Lesions

Type II SLAP lesions are characterized by a detachment of the superior labrum and the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii from the glenoid resulting in instability of the biceps-labral anchor. These is the most common type of SLAP tear. When we receive a script from a surgeon to treat a “SLAP repair” he or she is more than likely talking about a Type II SLAP and surgery to re-attach the labrum and biceps anchor.

Three distinct sub-categories of type II SLAP lesions have been further identified by Morgan et al: Arthroscopy ’90. They reported that in a series of 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic evaluation 37% presented with an anterosuperior lesion, 31% with a posterosuperior lesion, and 31% exhibited a combined anterior and superior lesion.

These findings are consistent with my clinical observations of patients. Different types of patients and mechanisms of injuries will result in slightly different Type II lesions. For example, the majority of overhead athletes present with posterosuperior lesions while individuals who have traumatic SLAP lesions typically present with anterosuperior lesions. These variations are important when selecting which special tests to perform based on the patient’s history and mechanism of injury.

 

Type III SLAP Lesions

Type III SLAP lesions are characterized by a bucket-handle tear of the labrum with an intact biceps insertion. The labrum tears and flips into the joint similar to a meniscus. The important concept here is that the biceps anchor is attached, unlike a Type II.

 

Type IV SLAP Lesions

Type IV SLAP lesions have a bucket-handle tear of the labrum that extends into the biceps tendon. In this lesion, instability of the biceps-labrum anchor is also present, similar to that seen in the type II SLAP lesion. This is basically a combination of a Type II and III lesion.

What is complicated about this classification system is the fact that the Type I-IV scale is not progressively more severe. For example a Type III SLAP lesion is not bigger, or more severe, or indicative to more pathology than a Type II SLAP lesion.
To further complicate things, Maffet et al: AJSM ’95 noted that 38% of the SLAP lesions identified in their retrospective review of 712 arthroscopies were not classifiable using the I-IV terminology previously defined by Snyder. They suggested expanding the classification scale for SLAP lesions to a total of 7 categories, adding descriptions for types V-VII.
  • Type V SLAP lesions are characterized by the presence of a Bankart lesion of the anterior capsule that extends into the anterior superior labrum.
  • Type VI SLAP lesion involve a disruption of the biceps tendon anchor with an anterior or posterior superior labral flap tear.
  • Type VII SLAP lesions are described as the extension of a SLAP lesion anteriorly to involve the area inferior to the middle glenohumeral ligament.

These 3 types typically involve a concomitant pathology in conjunction with a SLAP lesion. Although they provided further classification, this terminology has not caught on and is not frequently used. For example, most people will refer to a Type V SLAP as a Type II SLAP with a concomitant Bankart lesion.

Since then there have been even more classification types described in the literature, up to at least 10 that I know of, but don’t worry, nobody really uses them.

 

Top 5 things you need to know about classifying SLAP lesions

Here’s all you need to know about classifying SLAP tears:

  1. Just worry about Type I-IV SLAP lesions and realize that any classification system above Type IV just means that there was a concomitant injury in addition to the SLAP tear.
  2. You can break down and group Type I and Type III lesions together. Both involved degeneration of the labrum but the biceps anchor is attached. Thus, these are not unstable SLAP lesions and are not surgically repaired. This makes surgery (just a simple debridement) and physical therapy easier.
  3. You can also break down and group Type II and Type IV lesions together. Both involve a detached biceps anchor and require surgery to stabilize the biceps anchor. Type IV SLAP tears are much more uncommon and will involve the repair and a debridement of the bucket handle tear.
  4. Type II lesions are by far the most common that you will see in the clinic and are almost always what a surgeon is referring to when speaking of a “SLAP repair.”  That being said, we are seeing trends towards NOT repairing SLAP II lesions, as they may be more common than once expected.  This is especially true in overhead athletes.
  5. We all may have a Type I lesion, it is basically just fraying and degeneration of the labrum.

 

 

shoulder seminarLearn Exactly How I Evaluate and Treat the Shoulder

If you want to learn even more about the shoulder, my online course at ShoulderSeminar.com will teach you exactly how I evaluate and treat the shoulder.  It is packed with tons of educational content that will help you master the shoulder, including detailed information on the clinical examination and treatment of SLAP tears.

 

 

 

5 Ways to Decrease the Risk for an ACL Injury

Injuries to the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) are some of the most common injuries in the active population. As incidence of other injuries have decreased, injuries involving the ACL have rose astronomically over the years.  There have been numerous studies done looking at what causes the ACL to tear. More specifically, female athletes are 4-5x more likely to tear their ACL as compared to their male counterparts.

Like with any injury, it cannot be blamed on one thing. Injuries are multi-factorial as well as non-preventable.  Injuries will always happen.  The only thing that we can do is to decrease the frequency or incidence of them. Luckily, as we continue to learn more about the mechanism of injury, we have developed some strategies to reduce your chance of ACL injuries.

 

5 Ways to Decrease the Risk for an ACL Injury

Here are 5 things to focus on when designing programs to reduce ACL injuries.

 

Optimize Mobility

If you look at the human body, there are many joints. Some of those joints require mobility and some of those joints require stability. Depending on which plane of motion you are in, mobility or stability is usually more imperative than the other.

When it comes to mobility, there are certain joints in the body that we need to have optimal mobility in order to decrease the risk for an injury to the ACL. The two joints that come to mind are the talocrural joint of the ankle, and the femoroacetabular joint of the hip.

For the ankle, specifically dorsiflexion range of motion is imperative to decrease strain at the knee. If the ankle doesn’t have the ability to dorsiflex and absorb force during a land from a jump or cutting maneuver, the mid foot or knee are the two joints that will have to have increased mobility to accommodate the athletic endeavor.

 

Ankle Mobility

To assess for adequate ankle mobility, use the Knee to Wall Ankle Mobility Test.

Key Points:

  • Place your foot 4 inches away.
  • Keeping your foot flat on the floor, attempt to touch your knee to the wall.
  • Don’t allow for valgus or varus collapse.

If you can reach the wall from 4 inches, then you have sufficient ankle mobility to run, squat, and perform without playing increased stress through the knee due to poor ankle mobility.

The other joint in the body that needs to have optimal mobility is the hip.  The motions at the hip that need adequate mobility are hip flexion, hip extension, hip abduction, hip internal and external rotation.

Now, you may be saying, “Wow, that’s a lot of areas that need mobility.”  Well, let’s break it down!

 

Hip Flexion

5 ways to reduce ACL injuriesAnecdotally, I like to see clients present with full hip flexion. If there is decreased mobility into hip flexion, this can send a signal to the brain to alter movement and muscle firing patterns and in turn, can affect how someone lands or moves.

A quick and easy test is to test passive hip flexion range of motion.  

This involves bringing your knee towards your chest. Ideally, your thigh should reach the inferior aspect of your rib cage. Now, everyone is made differently and depending upon what sport you play, hip structure can vary from person to person.

If you cannot reach your thigh to your rib cage, slightly abduct your thigh and see if you can go further. If you can, then your hips are structured a little differently.

 

Hip Extension

Key Points:

  • Thigh should be able to reach parallel to ground.
  • Knee should be at 90 degrees to thigh.
  • Thigh should drop straight down and not flare out towards side of body.

Hip extension mobility is necessary to be able to activate the gluteus maximus and hamstrings in order to decrease incidence of a valgus collapse. If adequate hip extension mobility is not present, then muscular compensation will occur and in turn, possible injury.

 

Hip Internal Rotation (IR)

Even though hip internal rotation is part of the combination of movements that contribute to an ACL injury, not having the requisite mobility is a risk factor. If the body doesn’t have certain available ranges of motion, then the brain and central nervous system are not able to prevent going into those said ranges of motion. Therefore, if someone doesn’t have adequate hip internal rotation, then the body has no way to prevent that motion from occurring.

VandenBerg et al. in Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery that “risk of ACL injury is associated with restricted hip IR, and as hip IR increases, the odds of having an ACL tear decreases.”

 

Hip External Rotation

Hip external rotation is important because avoidance of a knee valgus position is necessary to avoid injury to the ACL. Having adequate hip external range of motion will allow the athlete to be able to get into an athletic position to avoid that valgus position.

 

Learn How to Land

You watch any NFL or NBA game and guys are jumping to catch a ball to to tap in a rebound for 2 points. Most injuries to the ACL don’t occur on the jumping portion as it does on the landing portion.

When athletes have to land from a jump, the body has to absorb 7-10x their body-weight in forces from the ground.  If joints aren’t in an ideal position to absorb and adapt to stress, injuries can happen.

landing mechanics ACL injury

Photo credit

Therefore, we need to assess athletes in their landing patterns and mechanics to make sure their body is resilient and capable to land properly.

 

Step Down Test

 

The Step Down Test is a simple way to determine an athlete’s predisposition to absorbing eccentric stress. Ideally, we like to see the pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle remain in a line during descent.

 

If someone steps down and the femur internally rotates and the knee goes into valgus collapse,  this is something that needs to be rectified.

If you want to use a more quantitative analysis of landing mechanics and skill as compared to the contralateral limb, then here are 3 tests that can help with that.

 

Single Leg Hop for Distance

Key Points:

  • Instruct the athlete to jump as far as then can and land on 1 leg.
  • They must stick the landing without hopping around or using their leg/arm for balance.
  • Perform 2 trials.  Measure each jump, take the average of the 2 trials, then repeat on the opposite leg.

 

Triple Hop for Distance

Key Points:

  • Instruct the athlete to jump as far as they can, land on 1 leg, and continue for 2 more hops, sticking the 3rd landing
  • They must stick the landing without hopping around or using their leg/arm for balance.
  • Perform 2 trials.  Measure each jump, take the average, then repeat on the opposite leg.

 

Crossover Hop for Distance

Key Points:

  • Instruct the athlete to jump as far as they can, land on 1 leg, and continue for 2 more hops, sticking the 3rd landing while crossing over a tape line on the floor with each jump.
  • They must stick the landing without hopping around or using their leg/arm for balance.
  • Perform 2 trials.  Measure each jump, find the average, then repeat on the opposite leg.

Now that you have the average for all 3 jumps, we need to determine if the difference between the two limbs is significant. According to Adams in the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, limb symmetry indexes of 90% have previously been suggested as the milestone for determining normal limb symmetry in quadriceps strength and functional testing.

According to Phil Plisky, one of the developers of the Y-Balance Test, he advocates that the athlete’s reconstructed lower extremity be within 95% on the non-involved leg.

To determine if distances hopped are significant, the involved limb must be within 90-95% of the non-involved side. If it is less than 90%, then that athlete is at risk for future knee injury.

Using a regimen consisting of single leg plyometrics in the sagittal, frontal, and transverse planes as well as single leg exercises that focus on power development can help to improve any major deficits.

 

Achieve Symmetry

If an athlete presents with a gross asymmetry, their risk for injury can increase 3-17x. Besides using the Hop Tests, one way to assess gross asymmetry is also using the Y-Balance Test.

The Y-Balance Test consists of 3 lower and upper body movements. For the sake of this post, we will be focusing on the lower body. The movements consist of:

y balance test ACL injuries

Photo credit

If there is greater than a 4 cm difference right vs left on the anterior reach (1st picture), this is considered a risk factor for a lower extremity injury.

Smith, Chimera, and Warren found in Medicine and Science in Sports & Exercise that “ANT (anterior)  asymmetry >4 cm was associated with increased risk of noncontact injury.”

If there is greater than a 6 cm difference right vs left on the posteromedial or posterolateral reaches, pictures 2 and 3, then this is considered a risk factor for a lower extremity injury.

Asymmetry is a normal thing.  Everyone from elite level athletes to the average joe has natural asymmetries right vs left. Some asymmetries may not change and some asymmetries may make someone the elite level athlete that they are. Having a relative asymmetry right vs left is ok, but having a gross asymmetry is not.

 

Enhance Core Stability

The core musculature is responsible for providing a stable base for the pelvis, hips, knees, ankles, etc. to function off of in life and in sport. If a stable base is not provided, then it can create instability and injury further down or up the kinetic chain.

Decreased core stability can cause:

  • Pelvic Drop
  • Femoral Internal Rotation
  • Knee Valgus
  • Tibial External Rotation
  • Subtalar Excessive Pronation

All these movements are associated with injuries of the ACL. By stabilizing proximally and providing a stable base for all of the aforementioned areas to work off of, this can decrease the risk for injury.

In order to test for core stability, the Trunk Stability Push-Up (TSPU) by Functional Movement is a good test.

This is a great test to determine if someone can maintain a neutral spine while performing a push-up, but also to determine if they have a base level of core stability to maintain a certain trunk position during life/sport.

If someone cannot maintain a specific trunk position, this doesn’t mean that they have a “weak core.” or weak upper extremities. It means that the athlete doesn’t have the capability to stabilize their core proximally in order to exude force distally.

 

Learn How to Decelerate

Most athletes are fast or at least quick on their feet. The great athletes can speed up and slow down better than anyone. One common risk factor we see with ACL injuries is the inability or subpar ability to be able to decelerate.

What this means is that if someone is going to stop or change direction, they need to have the necessary skills to control their body in space when going from accelerating, to decelerating, and then back to accelerating again.

All fast cars are fast! All really fast cars have great brakes!

In order to assess an athlete’s ability to decelerate, observe how the do with change of direction drills.  For example, movements such as:

 

Sprint/Backpedal w/ Redirection

Lateral Shuffles w/ Redirection

Sprint with 45 Degree Cut

Sprint with 90 Degree Cut

Backpedal, Stop, to 90 Degree Sprint

Backpedal, Stop, to 45 Degree Sprint

All of these various movements test an athlete’s ability to accelerate, decelerate and change directions in all planes of movement. A coach, personal trainer, or physical therapist should be present to provide the athlete with the redirection component. This makes it more random and unpredictable to make sure the athlete can react and move appropriately.

While observing these various change of direction movements, observe the mechanics of the pelvis and lower extremity.

Does the pelvis and hip/knee stay in a relative stable and neutral position when decelerating and stopping?

Does the pelvis and hip/knee go into a valgus collapse during decelerating, stopping, and accelerating phases of movement? Compare these right versus left lower extremities.

If you are having trouble observing these things with the naked eye, film it!  There are apps such as DartFish or Hudl that you can download to film athletes and then you can watch it in slow motion to observe any differences side to side.

If differences are seen in right and left comparison, then work on change of direction drills. When first starting off, start the athlete at ½ or ¼ speed so that they can work on their deceleration, stopping, and accelerating mechanics.

We don’t necessarily want to bombard the athlete with too much information about biomechanics of the lower extremity, but having a basic discussion with them and showing them how they currently move and how you would want them to move safely and more efficiently is ideal.

Then once, then can master ¼ or ½ speed, then increase the speed of the drills until you are working at full speed on both sides. There are a multitude of drills out there to work on acceleration, deceleration, stopping, and change of direction. Make sure start with the sagittal plane, and then progress into the frontal and transverse planes.  

If you can’t master the sagittal plane, then the frontal and transverse planes will be much more challenging.

Assessing mobility, landing mechanics, relative lower extremity symmetry, core stability, and acceleration/deceleration can all help to improve an athlete’s performance as well as decrease their risk for an ACL injury.

 

About the Author

Andrew Millett is a Boston-based physical therapist in the field of orthopedic and sports medicine physical therapy.  He helps to bridge the gap between physical therapy and strength and conditioning.  Visit his website at AndrewMillettPT.com.