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The 5 Biggest Mistakes People Make Returning to Training After a Shoulder Injury

Today’s post is an amazing guest post from two of my colleagues at Champion, Dave Tilley and Dan Pope. It’s really an honor to get to work with these guys everyday, as they are some of the brightest minds in the performance therapy and training industry right now. They recently release an educational product that I recommend everyone check out called Peak Shoulder Performance, learn more about it below, plus take advantage of a special discount for my readers!


We are very fortunate to work at a facility that is on the cutting edge of shoulder rehabilitation and sports performance. As a team at Champion, we have combined our ideas in a collaborative format to innovate some of the most effective methods for optimal shoulder training.

We have also been very fortunate that our professional work has given us first-hand experience helping a very diverse population of clients for shoulder-related issues. We have been lucky to see the systems we’ve created at Champion successfully help clients with shoulder injuries who are Division 1 and professional athletes, elite gymnasts, internationally competitive Olympic weightlifters, CrossFit games competitors, power lifters, and some of the most intense general population fitness enthusiasts out there. We can be very honest in saying that these people push their shoulders to the absolute limit with training and competition.

We mention these things not to seem egotistical or to brag. It is to highlight that a properly designed rehabilitation and performance program can get someone back to the highest level of training in sports.

The 5 Biggest Mistakes People Make Returning to Training After a Shoulder Injury

With this being said, we have found helping someone return to these highly demanding training environments following a shoulder injury is one of the trickiest areas to navigate. The knowledge our mentors have taught us and the experiences working with clients at Champion has given us some great insight to this challenge. We’ve experienced what works, what didn’t, and what really derails people when trying to get back to the training they love. In an effort to help readers out, here are five of the most common errors we see made when trying to return back to training following shoulder injury.

1. Rapidly Increasing Workload When Pain is Gone, or When Athletes are “Cleared”

This is without a doubt the most common error we have made as younger clinicians, and see others make regularly. Nothing is more exciting than when an athlete comes into the clinic saying they have been pain-free or got cleared by a doctor to train. However, we have to be very cautious about how much work we allow people to return to following shoulder injury.

Maybe you’ve heard clients say this:

“My shoulder was feeling much better so I jumped back into training. My pain has flared up again pretty bad. What happened?”

Yikes, not fun. We’ve had that stomach dropping moment more times than we care to admit. But, these things happen and it’s how we learn. With that said, it often feels like a problem that could have been avoided.

To help with this, we recommend you educate clients early in the rehabilitation process. Once you start feeling better, it’s not time to return to training full on. Things may be feeling great, but we still need to follow the continual game plan of progressive loading.

Start with the educational process, and then implement an objective plan of attack for rehabilitation. Things to keep in mind are the basic shoulder demands seen in a traditional training program. Things like vertical pushing and pulling, horizontal pushing and pulling, rotator cuff maintenance care and dynamic stability all come to mind. The plan must be outlined well in advanced and must take into account goals, timelines, and mild fluctuations in progress. If we plan and execute fully on this plan we can avoid athletes having flare up when they return to training.

2. Not Restoring Unilateral Strength Symmetry Before Bilaterally Loading The Shoulder

Everyone is going to have a dominant arm, and many sports require asymmetry for success (throwing sports come to mind). With that said, we see clients every week at Champion who continue to have shoulder pain because they failed to regain the most basic foundation of unilateral shoulder strength and stability before jumping back to training. Must people want to jump back into more fun exercises like bench pressing, pull ups, and push-ups before restoring symmetry.

We have to remember that with almost all shoulder injuries or pain comes protective inhibition and some degree of minor disuse atrophy. The severity of strength loss ranges widely based on the nature and severity of the injury. This is without considering that there may have been unilateral imbalances (right to the left) or training imbalances (push to pull ratios) that may have contributed to the injury in the first place.

At Champion, for athletes that are not asymmetrically biased, we like to see an objective 85% – 90% symmetry index for their baseline strength before progressing to advanced bilateral shoulder exercises in training. Sometimes we do this with dynamometers for basic strength. Other times we follow more multi-joint exercise comparisons for single arm floor presses, single arm pulldowns, single arm bent over rows, and 1/2 kneeling presses. If someone can single overhead press 40lbs for five reps on their uninvolved shoulder but struggles to get five clean repetitions with 20lbs on their involved side, returning to a bilateral barbell press may not be the best route at that time.

There is large variability based on the injury, athlete, and sport, but we suggest trying to write programs that close the gap and then focus in on more progressions. Again, it can save a lot of headaches down the road.

3. Treating the Cause of Shoulder Pain, Not Only The Site of Pain

This is very cliché in the Sports Medicine world, but remains extremely important. As Brandon Buchard says, “Just because it is common knowledge, doesn’t mean it is common practice.”

Before creating a return to a training program for a client, ask yourself,

“Have I considered all of the variables that may have contributed to this shoulder injury in the first place.”

Common overlooked factors include workload ratios, technique, programming, problems in joints adjacent to shoulder joint (lumbopelvic, thoracic, elbow), necessary baseline range of motion, strength, and exercise selection.

Now, there may be too many factors to address at once. Some factors may be out of your control. With that said as medical providers, athletes, and sport coaches we should try to tackle as many as we can. We should aim to educate the client as much as possible. Prioritize the main issues and have an open conversation with the client, parent, or coach for why addressing these issues is so important for both performance and re-injury risk. This drastically helps minimize a recurring problem snow balling down the road.

4. Medical Providers Not Creating Individualized, Objective, Return to Fitness Programs

This point goes in line directly with number one. Without a detailed roadmap for getting back to training goals, athletes often feel scattered and overwhelmed. I have found the best method is to start with a conversation on the primary goals or when the athlete desires to be back to sport. From that date, you can reverse engineer the progressions in training needed to aim for that end goal. Once the timeline is established, you can create a progression of exercises, sets, repetitions, and metabolic work in a periodized fashion. Here is a simplified example I use all the time at Champion

Goal: Pain-Free Body Weight Pull Ups in 2 months

Week 1 & 2:

  • Half kneeling single band pulldowns with bent elbow
  • 4×10, 2x/week, with 3-second eccentric tempo
  • Starting in 150 degrees of shoulder elevation and progressing to full 170 of shoulder elevation

Week 3 & 4:

  • Kneeling single arm Kieser or Weight Stack Pull Downs with bent elbow
  • 4×8, 2x/week, with 3-second eccentric tempo
  • Once 90% symmetry established, switch to bilateral Keiser/Weight Stack Pull Downs

Week 5 & 6:

  • Self-spotted pull-ups, standing on box for lower body assistance as needed
  • 5×5, 2x/week, focusing 1 second top and bottom hold

Week 7 & 8:

  • Progression to appropriate band assistance for 5×5, 2x/week
  • Reducing assistance until light or no band is needed

The exercises, sets, reps, and progression rate can be adjusted based on the injury type, client, and training age. Educate clients that the initial program you write is just the first attempt, and that you may need to adjust on the fly based on good or bad days. There may be small amounts of pain, but we personally tell people no more than a 3/10 and it can’t last for more than 24 hours.

Remember it’s less about the specific exercise prescription, and more about understanding the principles underlying the goal the client says they have. Doing this for the primary movements can be extremely helpful for the client and help you design a better program.

5. Not Continuing Basic Soft Tissue and Cuff Care for Maintenance

This is another shockingly common problem that comes up following successful reintegration to training. Athletes and coaches must remember that just because there is no pain, doesn’t mean you’re back to full function. As athlete’s train more they naturally acquire soft tissue stiffness, fatigue, and imbalances around their shoulder joint. This is variable based on the repetitive activates they are doing. Most commonly, we see the latissimus dorsi, teres major, pecs, upper trap, and subscapularis as culprits that cause losses in basic range of motion. Letting this slowly creep up is an easy way for pain to creep back in.

We must be dedicated to regular soft tissue management, strength balance work and high-level cuff strength. This is for a very similar reason as above. The more athletes tend to train, the more they focus on larger primary muscle groups and miss the same amount of development for their smaller stabilizers. When this imbalance creeps up it may create a situation for injury.

In an ideal world, the importance of this has been explained to the client and they maintain visits coming to see you as a provider. Manual therapy, hands-on strength work, and tweaking programs based on changes are incredibly helpful for athletes to get the most out of their shoulders. We are proud to have a lot of athletes realize the importance of this and continue to come on a bi-weekly or monthly basis for tune-ups.

Bonus – Lack of Communication Between All Parties

Open communication with parents, sport coaches, trainers and physicians is essential for athletes returning back to sports. Everyone needs to be on the same page with the athlete’s rehab. If any link in this chain is broken, athletes can be left frustrated and injuries can linger around. Having this communication ensures the bridge back to performance is successful and each professional is doing their part for the athlete.

If the athlete is an individual competitor, the most critical communication is between yourself and the athlete. The more transparent you can be, and the more open you are to answering athlete questions, the better.

Never be afraid to answer questions or concerns that come up. Be honest about the reality of ups and downs for returning to training, and also the possible positive or negative outcomes that come with big decisions. Discussing timelines, pain levels, proactive exercises, and prognosis can really ease the athletes mind and help them establish high levels of trust with you.

For what it’s worth, we have found that the higher the level of the athlete, the more they value honest and open communication. High level athletes are just people, and really appreciate the down to earth professionals who have their best interest in mind above all else.

Peak Shoulder Performance: The Ultimate Guide to Getting Out of Pain and Returning to High Level Fitness

If you enjoy this information, we’re happy to say it’s just the tip of the iceberg on how we approach returning to training after a shoulder injury. If you want to learn exactly how we return athletes back to high level fitness after a shoulder injury, be sure to check out our recently released online course that has been very well received.

We dive deep into the exact exercise progressions, principles, and maintenance care we use on athletes every day. This course is intended to help athletes themselves, medical providers, and coaches better understand this often-frustrating topic.

We know this information can help a lot of people, so we are going to offer a monster deal and chop off $50 from the original price just for Mike’s readers this week. Check out the link below to learn more, and enter “Reinold50” to cash in on the discount, good for this week only!  Offer ends Friday 3/9/18 at midnight EST:

 

 

Dan Pope DPT, OCS, CSCS, CF L1
CEO of Fitness Pain Free
Dave Tilley DPT, SCS, CSCS
CEO of SHIFT Movement Science

 

 

5 Exercises You Should Perform If You Sit All Day

Do you sit all day? Don’t worry you are not alone.

Sitting throughout the day, and a more sedentary lifestyle in general, has dramatically increased over the last several decades as desk jobs have become more popular and our devices have taken over as our form of entertainment.

The media loves to tell you that “sitting is the new smoking.” This is backwards in my mind, and something I’ve discussed in detail in a past article Sitting isn’t bad for you, not moving is.

In the article, I listed 3 things you should do if you sit all day to stay healthy:

  1. Move, Often
  2. Reverse your posture
  3. Exercise

For those looking for some specific exercise, here are 5 great exercises to perform to combat sitting all day.

 

5 Exercises You Should Perform if You Sit All Day

I’ve been talking about the concept of Reverse Posturing for years. The concept is essentially that we need to reverse the posture that we do the most throughout the day to keep our body balanced and prevent overuse.

Sitting involves a predominantly flexed posture, so doing exercises that promote the posterior chain would be helpful. These will depend on each person, but if I had to pick a basic set of exercises these would be the 5 exercises to combat sitting all day.

 

Thoracic Extension

The first exercise is for mobility of your thoracic spine. This is the portion of your back that becomes the most flexed while sitting all day. This is probably the biggest bang for you buck exercises in my mind:

If you are looking for more drills, you should view one of my past articles for several more great thoracic mobility drills.

 

True Hip Flexor Stretch

The second exercises is another mobility drill, this time for the pelvis. We always perform mobility drills first to maximize range of motion. This exercise is called the true hip flexor stretch, something I termed several years ago after seeing so many people do this stretch poorly.

This exercise will help prevent your hips from getting too tight, as well as put your entire spine in a better position.

Chin Nods

Now that we’ve done a couple of mobility drills, let’s try to reinforce a few movement patterns to reverse your sitting posture and activate a few select muscle groups.
The first is the chin nod, which is great for the neck muscles and forward head posture. Many have heard of the chin tuck exercise, but the chin nod exercise is a little different in my mind.

Shoulder W’s

The next exercise builds off the chin nods, and now combines the chin nod posture with retraction of your shoulders. This will help turn on your posterior rotator cuff and scapular muscles all in one drill.

Glute Bridge

Lastly, we want to focus on the glutes and their ability to extend the hips, and taking some pressure off your low back. This glute bridge exercise, in combination with the above true hip flexor stretch, will be a great combo to help with your overall posture and core control.

How to Integrate These Exercises into Your Day

An easy way to start and keep it simple is to perform each of these 10 times. These should take less than 5 minutes to perform and will make a big impact on how you feel throughout the day.
Many people ask, “how many times a day should I perform these?” Or even, “do I need to do these every day?”

You don’t need to do these every day. Just on the days that you sit… :)

But seriously, remember these are 5 exercises you should do if you sit all day, so doing them at the end of each day to reverse your posture is a great idea. Many people who sit for a really long time like to perform them during the day as well.

As you get comfortable with them, you may find that certain ones help you feel better than others. Feel free to add repetitions to those as needed.

 

Want a Comprehensive Online Training Program?

champion strong online training - multiple devicesWe’re super excited to now offer an amazing online training program, Champion Strong. It’s our flagship training program that we use at our gym Champion PT and Performance with many of our clients. It’s designed to give you a comprehensive program to follow at the gym that focuses on helping you look, feel, move, and perform better.

We have video demonstrations of all the exercises, plus a bunch of great educational videos to teach you the major movements. Plus it has an awesome training app to view, schedule, and log your workouts.

We’re really proud if it. Click below to learn more and sign up for less than $1 a day:

 

IASTM, Sports Rehab Experts, and Bootcamps

This week’s Stuff You Should Read comes from SportsRehabExpert, Mike Robertson, Jim Laird, Moly Galbraith, Erson Religioso, and myself!  Big week!

 

Inner Circle and RehabWebinars.com Update

My next Inner Circle webinar will be tomorrow, Friday January 18th at 11:15 AM EST.  We’ll be discussing tips on how to assess and treat shoulder impingement.  There will be a bunch of great concepts that both the rehab and fitness groups will benefit from, including how to detect what type of impingement is occurring, what that means for us, how to get over the hump, and how to train around the issue in the meantime.  Inner Circle members can log in to the Inner Circle Dashboard and sign up for the live event.  If you can’t make it, don’t worry, I’ll get a recording of it up on the website within a few days.  If you aren’t a member of my Inner Circle, click here to learn how to access this and all my past webinars for the price of a latte.

Kevin Wilk finished up his 4-part webinar series on the Current Concepts in Rehabilitation Following ACL Reconstruction this week over at RehabWebinars.com.  Part 4 discusses some of the postoperative complications, like anterior knee pain and loss of motion, including what to watch out for and how to get past them in rehab.  Kevin is one of the best PTs in the world and his rehab program for ACL reconstruction is top notch.  This is exactly how Kevin and I treat ACL reconstructions.  Learn more about RehabWebinars.com and if you want to get a a taste of the awesome content, there is a sign up box to get access to part 1 of Kevin Wilk’s ACL Rehab series for free.

 

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IASTMtechnique.com Update

As many of you know, I have been working on an educational solution to teach people how to use instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) in their practice.  You don’t need ultra-expensive tools, long seminars, or crazy certifications that add to thousands of dollars of expenses.  That is crazy, it’s not that hard!

Well, I have some exciting news!  The website isn’t ready yet, but I’ve teamed up with Erson Religioso of TheManualTherapist.com to collaborate on the educational material.  I’ve been working on this for some time and admit that the IASTMtechnique.com project was always getting pushed back by bigger projects.  With Erson’s help, we are going to get this project done and out their for you to access.  Erson brings a ton of experience with IASTM and is going to make this even better!

Stay tuned for more information as we develop the website, we’ll be talking about this more over the next several months.  In the meantime, head over to IASTMtechnique.com and enter your email to make sure you get all the updates and qualify for the special launch price, when it happens.

 

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2013 Sports Rehab Expert Teleseminar Series

Every year at this time Joe Heiler release an amazing and FREE teleseminar series from some of the leading people in our field.  This is a quick and easy way to get an update on what is current and what new concepts you’ll be hearing about in 2013.  Always a fun resource.  There is a new telemseminar each week, which can be accessed both live and afterward as a recording.  Here is this year’s list of speakers:

  • Dan John – discusses ‘Intervention:  Course Corrections for the Athlete and Trainer‘ including goal setting, training the 6 basic movements, proper exercise progression, and more…
  • Dr. Mark Cheng – talks about Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), acupuncture vs. dry needling, combining TCM with corrective exercise, kettlebells, and the martial arts.
  • Diane Lee – one of the foremost experts on the lumbopelvic-hip (LPH) complex, discussing assessment and treatment using her Integrated Systems Model, and putting it all together to rehab and train athletes.
  • Mike Voight – discusses the 4×4 matrix of the Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) to train motor control/stability and enhance movement.
  • Dr. Evan Osar – ‘Corrective Exercise Solutions for Common Hip and Shoulder Dysfunction‘ including breathing pattern corrections, the importance of joint centration, and more…
  • Jason Glass – Rotational power slings for golf and other rotation sports, screening rotational athletes, common injuries and prevention, and best training methods.
  • Robert Butler – researching the pillars of Functional Movement Systems including pain and effects on motor control, injury prediction and the FMS, and more…
  • Neil Rampe – using the Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) and Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) systems in professional baseball, identifying and addressing asymmetries.
  • Charlie Weingroff – discusses principles from his Training=Rehab and How to Make a Monster seminars including soft core vs. hard core training, using DNS principles and joint centration, using the SFMA to target dysfunction.
  • Dr. Mark Scappaticci – discusses his Functional Integrated Therapy (FIT) system including Fascial Abrasion Technique and Functional Integrated Needling, treating painful and non-painful dysfunction, and working with elite athletes.
  • Kelly Starrett – talks about the unique challenges of working with CrossFit and other athletes that push themselves to the limits, the importance of joint mobility, tissue quality, and movement, plus a whole lot more…

CLICK HERE to sign up for FREE access for the 2013 Sports Rehab Expert Teleseminar Series.

 

 

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Bootcamp in a Box

Bootcamp in a BoxWow, lots of new educational announcements this week!  For the fitness people, Mike Robertson, Jim Laird, and Moly Galbraith have teamed up to produce a complete done-for-you system on implementing fitness bootcamps .  What an outstanding group!  This looks like it’s going to be one of the best fitness educational products of the year.

Bootcamp in a Box is literally a 6-month done-for-you program designed by Mike, Jim, and Molly. They lay it all out  in a 200+ page manual and accompanying DVD – metabolic exercises, corrective exercises, progressions & regressions, cueing instructions, the works…

Seriously, Mike Robertson promises the bootcamp owner who puts this program to work WILL become the go-to place in his/her town, and I believe him!

Bootcamp in a Box is on sale this week during the launch so CLICK HERE and get in for 33% off before the launch ends tomorrow night.

 

 

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Fitness Gadget Review – Fitbit, Jawbone Up, Nike Fuel Band

I’m going to take a different approach to this week’s Stuff You Should Read and provide some Fitness Gadget Gift Ideas and review the Fitbit, Jawbone Up, and Nike Fuel Band.  ‘Tis the season.  If you know me, you know it takes me an hour to pick out cough medicine at CVS because I have to nitpick and compare every aspect (it’s a curse…).  Well, I just recently did a similar thing to the fitness tracking gadgets that are on the market now.  Since I did all the deliberating in my head, I hope you benefit from my OCD personality.

 

Inner Circle and RehabWebinars.com Update

I hope everyone had a great holiday and downtime last week.  My next live Inner Circle webinar will be tomorrow morning at 10:00 AM EST.  I will be discussing the system I use to stay current with new thoughts and research, and how you can build your own system too.  You’ll learn how you can quickly and easily build a system online to stay current.  Even if you put just a couple of these techniques into action, you’ll be able to enhance your skills.  Inner Circle members can sign up for the live webinar at the Inner Circle dashboard.  As always, I’ll get a recorded version up to the site sometime next week.  Click here to learn more about my Inner Circle.

For December, I know we all have a crazy month ahead of us.  I am going to talk more in depth about a couple of articles I from this site recently on the qualities we need to succeed and then do a live Q&A sessions via webinar.  I’ll do two live Q&A’s, one during the day and then try my best to do another in the evening during the week.  Come with your questions in hand and we’ll do a nice chat session online in a webinar.  If you have a specific case study or difficult patient you want to discuss, contact me and send me an email describing it and perhaps we’ll discuss.  I’ll let everyone know when these will be scheduled.

RehabWebinars.com actually featured a webinar of mine this month, discussing the Scientific and Clinical Rationale Behind Shoulder Exercises.  For those that know me, you know I enjoy this topic.  I discuss some of the latest research on selecting shoulder exercises.  Learn more about RehabWebinars.com.

 

Fitness Gadget Gift Ideas

For those looking for gift ideas for the fitness enthusiast in your life (or wondering what to ask for yourself!), here are three gifts ideas you may want to checkout.  Fitness trackers are hugely popular right now, with the three big names being Fitbit One, Nike Fuel Band, and the new Jawbone Up.

Fitbit One

Fitbit One Fitness Gadget Gift IdeasThe Fitbit brand has a few options, but the newest model, the Fitbit One is worth considering.  The Fitbit One tracks your steps, distance, calories, and stairs climbed in a pedometer that clips to your belt or shoe.  In addition, it has one of the better features to me, the ability to monitor your sleep cycles and wake you up silently using a smart alarm.  What this means is that when you tell it you want to wake up at 7:00 AM, it may notice that you are in a light state of sleep at 6:50 and will vibrate to wake you up before you drift back off into deep sleep, preventing you from waking up groggy.  While the smart alarm is cool, I like tracking my sleep quality just as much.  I have used this to monitor my training and stress levels.  It syncs wirelessly through Bluetooth, works with a bunch of great apps, and has a pretty nice app of it’s own.  Click here to learn more about the Fitbit One, it’s the #1 selling pedometer on Amazon.

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Nike Fuel Band

Nike Fuel Band Fitness Gadget Gift IdeasNike brings a similar product to the market in the form of a wrist band.  The Nike Fuel Band looks pretty cool (if you are into the whole wristband thing, I like it better than clipping on a Fitbit) and has a nice colorful display that looks cool (and doubles as a watch if you want).  The Nike Fuel app is OK, though Fitbit’s is better in my opinion.  It does sync wirelessly, but most disappointing to me is that it does not monitor your sleep or offer a smart alarm.  This is the biggest negative to me.  I would love to have all these features in one.  I should also note, the clip on wristband has a couple of drawbacks, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve pinched my wrist when putting it on, and I have also had it open up on me while wearing several times.  Nike has also tried to quantify fitness with what they call Nike Fuel.  They don’t tell you how they calculate it, but I have to admit it backfired for me.  I noticed what my Nike Fuel level was on days I didn’t work out and saw that I was still way above average, which encouraged me to take the day off from training.  I guess I’m pretty active at work…  Click here to learn more about the Nike Fuel Band.

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Jawbone Up

The Jawbone Up could be the perfect blend between the Fitbit and Nike Fuel Band.  Originally launched last the year, the wristband was pulled from the market as the product was not quite as water resistant as the advertised!  I see that as a positive, they’ve spent months redesigning and have just re-released the product.  I would imagine they wouldn’t risk another disaster (right???)!  The Jawbone Up is another wristband, though it doesn’t snap on the the Nike Fuel Band, which is probably a good thing.  It does monitor your sleep, have a smart alarm, and a cool app.  It also has the ability to track what you eat and your mood, making it a pretty complete package.  However, it does not sync wirelessly.  I personally don’t care about this feature the most.  Unfortunately, you can’t get the Jawbone Up on Amazon yet.  I think you can get it online from Jawbone or at the Apple Store, with Best Buy getting it soon.  Click here to learn more about the Jawbone Up.

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Here are few key points of each to help you decide.  The Fitbit probably makes sense for the greatest majority of people, the Nike Fuel Band is potentially the coolest, and the Jawbone Up has the best features if your like the wristband thing.  I would go with the Fitbit, but I think I like the wristband better, so I am going Jawbone Up.

  • Fitbit One – Sleep monitor, wireless, clips onto belt, works with a bunch of other apps
  • Nike Fuel Band – Has clock, wireless, wristband – does not have sleep monitor
  • Jawbone Up – Sleep monitor, wristband – does not wirelessly sync

 

These all seem like quick and easy gift ideas for a wide variety of people.  I’m a fan of these new fitness tracking gadgets so thought this was all worth sharing.  Which one are you getting???  Happy shopping, hope these fitness gadget gift ideas come in handy!

 

 

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