Do You Want to Learn More About Optimizing Movement and Enhancing Performance? 

I’m really excited to be launching my brand new course for rehabilitation and fitness professionals looking to help people restore, optimize, and enhance performance.   It’s my Introduction to Performance Therapy Training course.

And you know what the best part is???

It’s absolutely FREE!

Check out the information and video below, and click the link below to enroll today!

 

Introduction to Performance Therapy and Training

If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’d love to work with more highly motivated people, and even athletes, that want to focus on improving their performance.

But I remember not really feeling prepared for this or knowing how to get started, I really felt overwhelmed. We all learned the basics, but no one really teaches you how to optimize movement and enhance performance.

Over these years, I’ve learned a ton. Good and bad! But everything I have learned has shaped what I do, and it took some time and experience to realize this.

There so much info out there, but people tell me all the time they’re still confused and that they feel like they just start treatments and training programs and aren’t even confident that they choosing the right ones!

Check out this video for more of what I mean:

 

Enroll in My Course for FREE

I want to help.  When we started our facility at Champion PT and Performance, one of our biggest goals was to develop a simple system for our physical therapists and strength coaches to help people move and perform better.

My Introduction to Performance Therapy and Training program will teach you our 4-step system at Champion to assure you have everything you need to start helping people move and perform better.

Introduction to Performance Therapy and Training

Best of all, it’s absolutely free to anyone that signs up for my Newsletter. You’ll get all my best articles straight to your email, and immediate free access to the course.

Thank so much, hope you enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 3

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 3 is now available.

 

How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 3

This month’s Inner Circle webinar is on How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 3.  In this presentation, I discuss some of the concepts behind how to structure an excellent clinical examination process.  This will assure that you are always following a systematic process to detect any structural and functional issues, and that you can easily create a plan of treatment to help the person reach their goals.  This is part 3 of 4 and will focus on how to sequence your objective portion of your examination, as well as plenty of clinical pearls from experience. Part 3 is the first half of the exam, focusing on observation and mobility.  There’s a ton of info here so I wanted to break it down in detail.

This webinar series will cover:

  • The 4 main buckets of any clinical examination process
  • How to assure you follow a systematic approach each and every time
  • How to look for structural pathology, as well as find any suboptimal areas of function that may be related
  • How to take your exam and make an effective assessment and treatment plan

To access this webinar:

 

 

Measuring the Position and Mobility of the Patella

Measuring the position and mobility of the patella is still a very important component of my clinical examination of the knee.  It gives me a great sense of soft tissue restrictions that may be present when patellar hypomobility is noted.  This is especially common after knee surgery.  But measuring patella mobility is also important to assess generalized laxity when patellar hypermobility is observed.

The first time you feel either of these during your clinical exam, you’ll know what I mean.

But if you read through the literature, you may find conflicting results regarding the validity and reliability of assessing patella position and mobility.

The Reliability of Measuring Patella Mobility

One study that I reference often is a systematic review by Smith, who looked at the reliability of assessing patella position, specifically in the medial-lateral position.  Like any examination technique that is commonly performed, it is necessary to establish that the test has adequate intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. The test needs to be easily replicated and produce accurate results both between two different clinicians but also when repeated during re-evaluation with the same clinician.

Otherwise, the test may have limited use and not be able to provide helpful information.

The authors conclude the intra-tester reliability is good to assess medial-lateral patellar position, but inter-tester reliability was variable.  The variability is interesting to me and makes me wonder if we just aren’t standardizing how we look at patella mobility.

Another study by Herrington demonstrated that a group of 20 experienced therapists could reliably measure patellar position.  This tells me that a group of similar trained or skilled clinicians will show greater inter-tester reliability than a randomized selection of clinicians.  When I see that a test has good intra-tester and worse inter-tester reliability, I think one of two things:
The test is difficult to perform and/or is more accurate with more experience.

Reliability can be enhanced if we all use the same examination techniques. There may be subtle differences in techniques that may produce poor inter-tester reliability. This is what came to my mind when the Herrington study showed good inter-tester reliability with a group of experienced clinicians.

The Validity of Measuring Patella Mobility

In regard to validity of the measurements, the authors conclude that the criterion validity of this test is at worse moderate, based on limited evidence.  However, a couple of interesting studies were referenced.  A study by McEwan demonstrated that a lateral tilt of the patella greater than 5 degrees can be detected.  This was confirmed with MRI measurements.  The previously reported study by Herrington also reported that medial-lateral patellar position could accurately be measured as confirmed by MRI measurements.

A Simple Way to Measure Patella Mobility

It appears that clinical measurements of patellar positions can be both reliable and valid.  While intra-tester reliability, or your own ability to accurately repeat a test, appears to be more accurate, inter-tester reliability may be enhanced with a standardized examination technique.

Taking all this into consideration, I honestly do not try to “measure” patellar position.

I will assess the position but I do not try to place a label, such as millimeters or degrees, on the exact position.  If I want or need this information, I would much rather obtain this from a MRI.  I focus more on assessing the amount of hypomobility or hypermobility.

And there is a really simple way that we can do this that I think will great enhance our reliability.

To simplify this measurement, I try to just use a percentage of the patella that I feel can displace.  Here is how I do it:

  1. I break the patella down into 4 equal segments representing 25% of the width of the patella each.
  2. I visually try to establish where I believe the midline of the trochlea is located when I am measuring position.  If I am measuring displacement, I will visualize the edge of the lateral trochlea.
  3. I then measure the percentage of the patella that is positioned beyond the midline of the trochlea and then displace the patella and attempt to determine if 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the patella can displace beyond the lateral edge of the trochlea, as in the image below:

Measuring the Position and Mobility of the Patella

I’ve learned over the years that knee experts, such as Dr. Frank Noyes, consider 50% displacement to be “normal.”  I use that as a frame of reference, but comparing side-to-side is probably even more important.

I feel that this provides me with plenty of information to compare to the other extremity and simplifies the process, which I hope would enhance intra- and inter-tester reliability.  If we all do it this way, I think we’ll be far more accurate.

What do you think? Is this too simple? How do you measure patellar mobility?

 

How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 2

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 2 is now available.


How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 2

This month’s Inner Circle webinar is on How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 2.  In this presentation, I discuss some of the concepts behind how to structure an excellent clinical examination process.  This will assure that you are always following a systematic process to detect an structural and functional issues, and that you can easily create a plan of treatment to help the person reach their goals.  This is part 2 of 2 and will focus on the objective, assessment, and planning portions of the exam.

This webinar series will cover:

  • The 4 main buckets of any clinical examination process
  • How to assure you follow a systematic approach each and every time
  • How to look for structural pathology, as well as find any suboptimal areas of function that may be related
  • How to take your exam and make an effective assessment and treatment plan

To access this webinar:

 

 

How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 1

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 1 is now available.


How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 1

This month’s Inner Circle webinar is on How to Perform a Thorough and Systematic Clinical Examination – Part 1.  In this presentation, I discuss some of the concepts behind how to structure an excellent clinical examination process.  This will assure that you are always following a systematic process to detect any structural and functional issues, and that you can easily create a plan of treatment to help the person reach their goals.  This is part 1 of 2 and will focus on the general concepts and subjective component of the exam.

This webinar series will cover:

  • The 4 main buckets of any clinical examination process
  • How to assure you follow a systematic approach each and every time
  • How to look for structural pathology, as well as find any suboptimal areas of function that may be related
  • How to take your exam and make an effective assessment and treatment plan

To access this webinar:

 

Special Tests for Rotator Cuff Tears

Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common injuries we see in orthopedic physical therapy.

During the clinical examination of the shoulder, we want to perform special tests designed to detect a rotator cuff tear.  

Below are my 4 favorite special tests for rotator cuff tears that I perform during my clinical examination of the shoulder.  These 4 tests do a good job detecting larger tears that are causing dysfunction.

As rotator cuff tears become more common, we are starting to see them in younger and more active patients.  In these patients, they often have smaller tears and it is much more difficult to detect with our special tests.  These types of patients often present with pain and weakness, and not as much dysfunction as you would see in a traditional older patient with a more degenerative tear.  

This is likely because their rotator cuff tear is either small or partial.  These are often just isolated to the supraspinatus muscles as well, and their other rotator cuff muscles are functioning well.  

As a rotator cuff tear becomes larger, retracted, and more degenerative in nature, the patient’s shoulder dysfunction will become more apparent as it becomes difficult for the rotator cuff as a group to function well.

 

Shoulder Shrug Sign

The first special test I perform to diagnose a rotator cuff tear is the shoulder shrug sign.

During this test, the key to check if they can actively elevate their arm if you help them past their shrug arc.  When the shoulder is positioned below 90 degrees, the line of pull and the force vector of the deltoid muscles is superior.  This is often counterbalanced by the line of pull and force vector of the rotator cuff.

In the image below, the left is the line of pull of the deltoid at various shoulder positions.  The picture on the right is the supraspinatus. Notice how the deltoid starts to have a similar line of pull as the rotator cuff once the shoulder reaches 90-120 degrees of elevation:

If the rotator cuff is torn, then the deltoid is the dominant muscle and the resultant force vector is more superior.  

This is the shrug.

However, one you get the arm overhead, the deltoid is now more in line with the rotator cuff and can help center the humeral head within the glenoid fossa.  

So, you want to passively help them get above this position to see if they can elevate towards the upper range of elevation.

There isn’t really any information in the literature regarding this test.  It’s not something you’d probably find as a specific test for a rotator cuff tear, but something I have clinically found to be relevant to me.

 

Shoulder Drop Arm Test

The next rotator cuff tear special test that I perform is the drop arm test.  The concept of this test is pretty similar to the shrug sign. You passively elevate the arm and see if they can hold that position without the arm dropping, or shrugging.

If the arm drops or shrugs, then the rotator cuff likely isn’t able to counterbalance the superior line of pull of the deltoid.

The research has shown that the sensitivity of the drop arm test is low to moderate, but specificity is high from 80-100%.  This is consistent with most of your clinical examination of the shoulder. You usually have to have a significant tear to start seeing these tests positive.

 

Rotator Cuff Lag Sign

The rotator cuff lag signs are similar special tests as the drop arm test.  Essentially, they are like a drop arm for external rotation of the shoulder instead of elevation.

As rotator cuff tears get larger, they tend to extend from the supraspinatus into the infraspinatus.  The lag signs show a difficulty in the external rotators holding the arm against gravity.

The test appears to be specific in the literature with specificity between 88-100% and several studies in the 90% range.  Sensitivity has varied in studies, but has shown 45-56% sensitivity to detect full thickness supraspinatus tears, 70% in infraspinatus tears, and 100% in teres minor tears.  This makes sense to me as it’s a better test for larger tears extending into the infraspinatus and teres minor.

 

Lag Sign at 90 Degrees

I also like to perform a variation of the lag sign at 90 degrees of elevation.  It is the same test as the traditional lag sign, however, I have found this test to be even more challenging.  I have seen patients that had a positive lag sign at 90 degrees of elevation, and a negative lag sign at 20-30 degrees.  It’s simply a more challenging position for the cuff.

The research has shown this to have specificity between 70-100%, however varying sensitivity from 20-100%.  But again, for the same reasons as the lag sign above.

 

Special Tests for Rotator Cuff Tears

If you use all four of the above special tests as a cluster, I think you’ll often be able to detect a large full thickness rotator cuff tear during your clinical examination.  These tests tend to be more sensitive to larger tears in older and more degenerative patients.

But remember, special tests are just a piece of the puzzle.

 

 

Clinical Examination of Superior Labral Tears – What is the Best Special Test for a SLAP Tear?

**Updated in 2017**

What is the best test for a SLAP tear?  That is a pretty common question that I hear at meetings.

Clinical examination to detect SLAP lesions is often difficult because of the common presence of concomitant pathology in patients presenting with this type of condition. Andrews has shown that 45% of patients (and 73% of baseball pitchers) with superior labral lesions have concomitant partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus portion of the rotator cuff.  Mileski and Snyder reported that 29% of their patients with SLAP lesions exhibited partial thickness rotator cuff tears, 11% complete rotator cuff tears, and 22% Bankart lesions of the anterior glenoid.

The clinician should keep in mind that while labral pathologies frequently present as repetitive overuse conditions, such as those commonly seen in overhead athletics, the patient may also describe a single traumatic event such as a fall onto the outstretched arm or an episode of sudden traction, or a blow to the shoulder.  This is an extremely important differentiation you need to make when selecting which tests you should perform.

A wide variety of potentially useful special test maneuvers have been described to help determine the presence of labral pathology.  Lets review some of them now.

This article is part of a 4-part series on SLAP Lesions

Special Tests for a SLAP Tear

There are literally dozens of special tests for SLAP tears of the shoulder.  I am going to share some of the most popular SLAP tests.

 

Active Compression Test

active compression SLAP testThe active compression test is used to evaluate labral lesions and acromioclavicular joint injuries. This could be the most commonly performed test, especially in orthopedic surgeons.  I am not sure why, though, I do not think it is the best.

The shoulder is placed into approximately 90 degrees of elevation and 30 degrees of horizontal adduction across the midline of the body. Resistance is applied, using an isometric hold, in this position with both full shoulder internal and external rotation (altering humeral rotation
against the glenoid in the process). A positive test for labral involvement is when pain is elicited when testing with the shoulder in internal rotation and forearm in pronation (thumb pointing toward the floor). Symptoms are typically decreased when tested in the externally rotated position or the pain is localized at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint.

O’Brien et al found this maneuver to be 100% sensitive and 95% specific as it relates to assessing the presence of labral pathology.  These results are outstanding, maybe too outstanding. Pain provocation using this test is common, challenging the validity of the results. In my experience, the presence of deep and diffuse glenohumeral joint pain is most indicative of the presence of a SLAP lesion. Pain localized in the AC joint or in the posterior rotator cuff is not specific for the presence of a SLAP lesion. The posterior shoulder symptoms are indicative of provocative strain on the rotator cuff musculature when the shoulder is placed in this position.

The challenging part of this test is that many patients will be symptomatic from overloading their rotator cuff in this disadvantageous position.

  • Sensitivity: 47-100%, Specificity: 31-99%, PPV: 10-94%, NPV: 45-100% (a lot of variability between various authors)

 

Biceps Load Test

The biceps load testBiceps Load SLAP Test involves placing the shoulder in 90 degrees of abduction and maximally externally rotated. At maximal external rotation and with the forearm in a supinated position, the patient is instructed to perform a biceps contraction
against resistance. Deep pain within the shoulder during this contraction is indicative of a SLAP lesion.
The original authors further refined this test with the description of the biceps load II maneuver. The examination technique is similar, although the shoulder is placed into a position of 120 degrees of abduction rather than the originally described 90 degrees.  The biceps load II test was noted to have greater sensitivity than the original test.  I like both of these tests and usually perform them both.
  • Sensitivity: 91%, Specificity: 97%, PPV: 83%, NPV: 98% for Biceps Load I; Sensitivity: 90%, Specificity: 97%, PPV: 92%, NPV: 96% for Biceps Load II

 

Compression Rotation Test

Compression Rotation SLAP TestThe compression-rotation test is performed with the patient in the supine position. The glenohumeral joint is manually compressed through the long axis of the humerus while, the humerus is passively rotated back and forth in an attempt to trap the labrum within the joint. This is typically performed in a variety of small and large circles while providing joint compression when performing this maneuver, in an attempt to grind the labrum between the glenoid and the humeral head. Furthermore, the examiner may attempt to detect anterosuperior labral lesions by placing the arm in a horizontally abducted position while providing an anterosuperior directed force. In contrast, the examiner may also horizontally adduct the humerus and provide a posterosuperiorly directed force when performing this test.  I think of this test as “exploring” the joint for a torn labrum.  It is hit or miss for me.

  • Sensitivity: 24%, Specificity: 76%, PPV: 90%, NPV: 9%

 

Dynamic Speed’s Test

dynamic speeds SLAP testThe Speed’s biceps tension test has been found to accurately reproduce pain in instances of SLAP lesions.  I have personally not seen this to be true very often.

It is performed by resisting downwardly applied pressure to the arm when the shoulder is positioned in 90 degrees of forward elevation with the elbow extended and forearm supinated. Clinically, we also perform a new test for SLAP lesions.

Kevin Wilk and I developed a variation of the original Speed’s test, which we refer to as the “Dynamic Speed’s Test.”  (I came up with the name, what do you think?)  During this maneuver, the examiner provides resistance against both shoulder elevation and elbow flexion simultaneously as the patient  elevates the arm overhead. Deep pain within the shoulder is typically produced with shoulder elevation above 90 degrees if this test is positive for labral pathology.

Anecdotally, we have found this maneuver to be more sensitive than the originally described static Speed’s test in detecting SLAP lesions, particularly in the overhead athlete.  To me, it seems like you only get symptoms with greater degrees of elevation, making the original Speed’s Test less sensitive in my hands.

  • Sensitivity: 90%, Specificity: 14%, PPV: 23%, NPV: 83% for the Speed’s test

 

Clunk and Crank Tests

clunk crank slap testThe clunk test is performed with the patient supine. The examiner places one hand on the posterior aspect of the glenohumeral joint while the other grasps the bicondylar aspect of the humerus at the elbow. The examiner’s proximal hand provides an anterior translation of the humeral head while simultaneously rotating the humerus externally with the hand holding the elbow.  The mechanism of this test is similar to that of a McMurray’s test of the knee menisci, where the examiner is attempting to trap the torn labrum between the glenoid and the humeral head. A positive test is produced by the presence of a clunk or grinding sound and is indicative of a labral tear.

The crank test can be performed with the patient either sitting or supine. The shoulder is elevated to 160 degrees in the plane of the scapula. An axial load is then applied by the examiner while the humerus is internally and externally rotated in this position. A positive test typically elicits pain with external rotation. Symptomatic clicking or grinding may also be present during this maneuver.  These tests seem to do well with finding a bucket-handle tear of from a Type III or Type IV SLAP lesion more than anything else for me.

  • Sensitivity: 39-91%, Specificity: 56-93%, PPV: 41-94%, NPV: 29-90%

 

 

2 New(er) Special Tests for SLAP Lesions

In addition to the classic SLAP tests that have been described, there are two additional tests that gained popularity more recently.

I wanted share a video that I have on YouTube that demonstrates these two tests. These were actually published in a paper I wrote in JOSPT a few years ago, but I have modified them a little and wanted to share. These two tests are both excellent at detecting peel-back SLAP lesions, specifically in overhead throwing athletes, but are useful for any population. I share these two tests because I know that there is a lot of confusion regarding the “best” test. These may not be them, but in my hands, both have been extremely helpful and, more importantly, accurate.

Pronated Load SLAP Test

The first test is the “Pronated Load Test,” it is performed in the supine position with the shoulder abducted to 90° and externally rotated. However, the forearm is in a fully pronated position to increase tension on the biceps and subsequently the labral attachment. When maximal external rotation is achieved, the patient is instructed to perform a resisted isometric contraction of the biceps to simulate the peel-back mechanism. This test combines the active bicipital contraction of the biceps load test with the passive external rotation in the pronated position, which elongates the biceps. A positive test is indicated by discomfort within the shoulder.

 

Resisted Supination External Rotation SLAP Test

The second test was described by Myers in AJSM, called the “Resisted Supination External Rotation Test.” Dr. Myers was a fellow at ASMI and a good friend of mine, he really wanted to call this the SUPER test (for SUPination ER) but I was one of many that advised him against this for obvious reasons!

During this test, the patient is positioned in 90° of shoulder abduction, and 65-70° of elbow flexion and the forearm in neutral position. The examiner resists against a maximal supination effort while passively externally rotating the shoulder. Myers noted that this test simulates the peel-back mechanism of SLAP injuries by placing maximal tension on the long head of the biceps by supinating.

Myers’ study of 40 patients revealed that this test had better sensitivity (82.8%), specificity (81.8%), positive predictive value (PPV) (92.3%), negative predictive value (NPV) (64.3%), and diagnostic accuracy (82.5%) compared to the crank test and extremely popular O’Brien’s or active compression test. A positive test is indicated by discomfort within the shoulder.

 

When Do You Perform These Tests?

Now that you know a bunch of special tests for SLAP tears, the real key is understanding “when” to pick each test.  In my mind, they all are slightly different and may even be better at detecting different types of SLAP lesions.  I have an Inner Circle webinar that discusses this and shows you my clinical algorithm on how and why I perform special tests to diagnose a SLAP tear:

 

 

Learn Exactly How I Evaluate and Treat the Shoulder

shoulder seminarIf you want to learn even more about the shoulder, my online course at ShoulderSeminar.com will teach you exactly how I evaluate and treat the shoulder.  It is packed with tons of educational content that will help you master the shoulder, including detailed information on the clinical examination and treatment of SLAP tears.

 

 

 

Special Tests to Diagnose SLAP Tears

The latest Inner Circle webinar recording on Special Tests to Diagnose SLAP Tears is now available.

 

 

Special Tests to Diagnose SLAP Tears

This month’s Inner Circle webinar is on Special Tests to Diagnose SLAP Tears.  In this presentation, I review the many, many different SLAP special tests that exist and explain when and why you would choose certain ones for different people.

This webinar will cover:

  • Why there are so many different SLAP special tests
  • The common mechanisms of injury for SLAP tears
  • Why a good subjective history should lead your clinical examination
  • How to choose specific special tests for specific people
  • How to perform my most commonly used SLAP tests

To access this webinar: