The Rationale Behind Shoulder Exercises

imageI am lucky to be able to share my latest journal article from this month’s JOSPT with you,  entitled Current Concepts in the Scientific and Clinical Rationale Behind  Exercises for Glenohumeral and Scapulothoracic Musculature.  I am very excited about this paper and have been working on the concept and background information on this paper for years.

prone 2Despite a couple of decades of EMG research on shoulder exercises, there were still many unanswered questions regarding the optimal exercise for each muscle.   In the early 2000’s we sought to answer some of the questions that were looming regarding the selection of exercises by performing our own versions of EMG studies.  You can find these in two articles on the external rotators and the supraspinatus.  In addition, I have written a couple of book chapters over the years that gradually built on this concept.  But what put this all over the edge was my collaboration with Rafael Escamilla, a colleague I truly respect and admire.  Rafael really put this paper over the edge and I couldn’t have done it without him.

Thanks to JOSPT for allowing me to share this for educational purposes to all of those that are not subscribers.

Click below to download:

Current Concepts in the Scientific and Clinical Rationale Behind Exercises for the Glenohumeral and Scapulothoracic Musculature

Would really like to hear your thoughts and comments on the rationale behind why you choose some of these or other exercises for the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic joints.

UPDATE: There will soon be a webinar on this topic at RehabWebinars.com.  Learn more about RehabWebinars.com.

3 replies
  1. Nick Pontifex
    Nick Pontifex says:

    Hi Mike,
    You can disregard the second part to my first post, i went back and read your 2005 article on SLAP lesions which was very good and explained a few things.
    Not sure if you or anyone else thinks this is any good, but i modify the side-lying ER exercise to add a mini row before each repetition. I feel it sets the scapular and activates the musculature better, otherwise the scapular seems to relax and drift into a little protraction during the set.
    Thanks,

    Nick

  2. Nick Pontifex
    Nick Pontifex says:

    Hi Mike,
    I was wondering whether this information will lead to any changes with the “thrower’s ten program”. It sounds like the prone ER at 90 degrees abuction exercise would be more harm than good over the long haul for baseball pitchers with the higher capsular strain effects.
    And quickly, i am guessing you weren’t a big fan of the “update on SLAP lesions” article in the same edition of the JOSPT. They mentioned capsular tightness as a cause for GIRD a few times and didn’t really link the special tests with the mechanism of injury. They also mentioned that they keep the shoulder in internal rotation in the sling post-op which is opposite to what it says in the “athlete’s shoulder”. Do you know of any good reason why they do that?
    Thanks,

    Nick

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